Wednesday, August 31, 2011

World Studies (Units/Themes)


Reading and Interpreting Maps
-A Map is a Kind of Picture
-Map Symbols That Represent Natural Things
-Map Symbols That Represent Man-Made Things
-Symbols for Boundaries
-Using a Compass to Find Directions
-Using Directions to Locate Cities and States
-Locating Places on a Street Map
-Locating Places Through the Use of a Map Index
-Identifying Water and Coastal Features
-Locating Places with Lines of Latitude and Longitude
-Time Zones in the Unites States
-Determining Elevation on Flat Maps Through Color
-Determining Elevation from Contour Lines
-Finding Man-made Things on Topographical Maps
-Reading and Interpreting Maps


The World's Continents and Oceans
-Locating Continents and Oceans
-Locating Countries and Capital Cities
-Locating States, Capitals
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2010/11/world-studies-north-america.html
-Locating Seas, Lakes, Rivers

Geography Enrichment Activities
World Studies:
Continue U.S. History Geography packets
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2010/04/world-studies-project.html
Geography Hangman Game:

http://www.manythings.org/hmf/hm-geography.html
Countries of the World:

http://www.quia.com/hm/22745.html
States/Capitals Hangman

http://www.studystack.com/hangman-16045
Name the Capitals:
http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/USA_Geography/USA_1b_Caps_1024_768.html
Name the States (up to three players)

http://www.toonuniversity.com/5s_usgeo_d.html
Geography Jumble:

http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/games/game_geography_jumble.html
Geography Trivia Game:
http://funschool.kaboose.com/fun-blaster/back-to-school/games/game_trivia_archer.html
Matching World Capitals Game:
http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/games/game_capitals.html
Matching World Geography Game:
http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/games/game_my_world.html
Timed United States Geography Game:
http://funschool.kaboose.com/globe-rider/celebrate-usa/games/game_us_state_detective.html
Hangman Countries:
http://www.hangman.learningtogether.net/countries/index.htm
U.S. Capitals:
http://www.superkids.com/aweb/tools/words/hangman/us_caps.sht

Many more interactive geography games:
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2010/04/world-studies-interactive.html

The Road to Revolution

U.S. History:
Writing Assignment: Look up the word "revolution" Write down the definition. Based on what you've learned so far from lecture and reading, do you believe the American Revolution was a "revolution"?

Class discussion: Compare and contrast the goals of national leaders, loyalists, women, traders and slaves in the American Revolution. Complete a graphic organizer on the white board. Draw a web on the board. In the center, write Revolution. Branching out draw two circles. In one, write yes and in the other, write no. Branching out from these circles, list which groups were likely to support or not support independence. Branching from each of these groups, list reasons why or why not.

Continue: "The Patriot".

Cause and Effect Sequencing of Events worksheet (to be worked on throughout the week)

The Midnight Ride of Paul Revere, Longfellow:
http://www.online-literature.com/henry_longfellow/946/

Jim Crow in History

United States History
Jim Crow: Remembering Jim Crow on Minnesota Public Radio
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2008/04/jim-crow.html

Threaded Discussion on the white board
CNN Investigative Reports: Behind the Noose
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2008/07/cnn-special-investigations-unit-display.html

Plessy v. Ferguson 1896

Notes:
Stereotypes:


A "stereotype" is a generalization about a person or group of persons. We develop stereotypes when we are unable or unwilling to obtain all of the information we would need to make fair judgments about people or situations. In the absence of the "total picture," stereotypes in many cases allow us to "fill in the blanks." Our society often innocently creates and perpetuates stereotypes, but these stereotypes often lead to unfair discrimination and persecution when the stereotype is unfavorable.

A stereotype is a way we simplify our world. It is a short-hand way we deal with complex events. Stereotypes become dangerous when they leave us blind to individual differences.

Prejudice/Discrimination:

Prejudice: A negative or hostile attitude toward another social group

Discrimination: Refers to an unfavorable action, behavior, outcome or treatment
Effects:

Less access to:

-approval and popularity

-rights and privileges

-power, knowledge and popularity


Exposure to social risks:

-victimization through violence

-suspicion and blame for crimes

-rejection, alienation and isolation, which contributes to low self esteem, self-hatred and self-destructive behavior

-economic exploitation and oppression

Examples in history have been:

* African-Americans being forced to ride in the back of the bus

* German Jews being required to wear a yellow "Star of David"

* minorities being referred to by pejorative slang names

* minorities being the subject of jokes which poke fun at the target's race, religion, or ethnic origin, and which rely on stereotypes

* Japanese-Americans being isolated in camps during World War II

* Native Americans having their land confiscated in violation of treaties, being the victims of government-sponsored massacres, and being placed on reservations.

Eyes on the Prize Notes, Worksheets, Activities:
http://www.pps.k12.or.us/depts-c/serv_learning/student_packet.pdf

Chapter/Unit 1: A Young People's History of the United States

United States History
Part I:
A Young People's History of the United States, Chapter 1
After reading chapter one, use the adjectives below and write an "A" for Arawak, "C" for Christopher Columbus, "S" for Spanish, "E" for English, and "P" for Powhatans next to each adjective that would describe that group. You may use each adjective more than once.

Cruel, Generous, Arrogant, Naive, Kind, Adventurous, Intelligent, Lazy, Honest, Brave, Primitive, Heroic, Greedy, Ignorant, Inferior, Thoughtful.

Look for facts in the text to demonstrate why you chose particular adjectives for different groups/individuals.

Discuss: The purpose of Columbus's voyage(s) was...
Discuss: The result of Columbus's voyage(s) was...

In your opinion, what are the three most important things Zinn says about Columbus?

Compare and contrast Columbus and Las Casas's diary entries. (Use a venn diagram.)

Part II: Compare and contrast chapter 1 with the video below:
Printable Venn Diagram:
Part III:
Modified "The People vs. Columbus"


Thursday, August 25, 2011

Welcome Back! (First Week)


First Week:
Classroom Expectations:
Classroom Climate:
 RESPECT is key. What does that mean? Respect the ideas and work of your classmates. (No "put-downs," name-calling or other rude behavior will be tolerated.) Listen quietly while I'm giving instructions, lecturing, etc. (If this becomes an issue, I will assign seats and groups. Listen quietly while your classmates are speaking.) NO TEXTING OR LISTENING TO IPODS DURING CLASS UNLESS I SPECIFICALLY GIVE YOU PERMISSION TO DO SO!

NEW: All cellphones will be placed on my desk at the beginning of each class period. You may pick up your cellphone at the end of the class period.

Participation:
It is important that you come to class prepared everyday. That includes coming to class with a notebook, planner, pen and highlighter.It is also important for each person to participate in individual, small and large group activities to the best of your abilities.
General Expectations:
Please be on time. I will take attendance right after the bell rings. If you arrive late, you will be marked tardy. Three tardies will result in a referral.

Please do not abuse the pass privilege. If excessive use of passes becomes an issue, I will no longer grant bathroom, locker, etc. passes.  Only one student out of the room at a time.
http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/15_01/role151.shtml


Please leave the room in a neat, orderly manner. Do not leave garbage on the floor or on or under the tables. Please do not write on the tables or white boards. Please do not move the tables unless I ask you to do so.

Grading:A: 100-90
B: 89-80
C: 79-70
D: 69-60
Below 60: F

Contact me: (Check your email at least twice a week!)
lhansen@rvschools.org

All classes:
Team Building Activity:
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2011/08/fun-team-building-activities.html

United States History
A Young People's History of the United States, Chapter 1
After reading chapter one, use the adjectives below and write an "A" for Arawak, "C" for Christopher Columbus, "S" for Spanish, "E" for English, and "P" for Powhatans next to each adjective that would describe that group. You may use each adjective more than once.

Cruel, Generous, Arrogant, Naive, Kind, Adventurous, Intelligent, Lazy, Honest, Brave, Primitive, Heroic, Greedy, Ignorant, Inferior, Thoughtful.

Look for facts in the text to demonstrate why you chose particular adjectives for different groups/individuals.

Discuss: The purpose of Columbus's voyage(s) was...
Discuss: The result of Columbus's voyage(s) was...

In your opinion, what are the three most important things Zinn says about Columbus?

Compare and contrast Columbus and Las Casas's diary entries. (Use a venn diagram.)

English:
Introduce: The Freedom Writers Diary
First Day: "The Line Game"
Vocabulary: Bias, Prejudice, Discrimination, Racism, Sexism, Homophobia, Hate Crime, Anti-Semitism

World Studies:
Reading and Interpreting Maps (Chapter 1)
"A Map is a Kind of Picture"
"Map Symbols That Represent Natural Things"
Map Reading Activity (Interactive)
Name That Park (Interactive)
Historic Destinations (Interactive)
All students:
Learning Styles Inventory (done in class)
http://www.ldrc.ca/projects/miinventory/mitest.html
Learning Styles Inventory (Extra Credit) Print a copy of the results and hand in for extra credit.
http://www.edutopia.org/multiple-intelligences-learning-styles-quiz

Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Child Poverty in the United States

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/08/17/child-poverty-climbs-in-3_n_929905.html

http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2011/08/16/national/main20093300.shtml?tag=contentMain;contentBody

http://abcnews.go.com/Health/US/hunger-children-america-slow-steady-starvation/story?id=14328390

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/rundown/2011/08/child-poverty-data-released.html



Read the articles linked above and answer the questions below.

The United States government considers and income of __________ for a family of four to be "poor."

List five of the 10 "indicators" of child poverty according to the national study on child well-being conducted by the Annie E. Casey Foundation.

How many states had increases in the number of children living in poverty?

Children who grow up in poverty are more likely to___________ and less likely to _____________.

What percentage of American children live in economically insecure homes?

Children in which state have been affected most by foreclosure and/or their parents' job loss?

Which state has the worst high school graduation rate in the nation? Which state has the highest graduation rate in the nation?

Which state has the highest percentage of children living in poverty?

List two programs that can act as a "dam" against the flood of poverty?