Monday, January 31, 2011

Civil Rights Activity



Toolbox for change:

Everyone will receive a photocopy of a toolbox. Fill your toolboxes with "tools" for change (things used by Civil Rights leaders in their struggle for civil rights). We will brainstorm a list of ten things as a class. Each individual must come up with ten additional "tools". You will need to find pictures of these things (or pictures of things that symbolize your "tools") from magazines. Cut out your pictures and glue them in your "toolbox". Write a brief explanation of why you selected each tool on the back of your "toolbox".




Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Stereotypes, Prejudice, Discrimination: Notes

Notes:
Take a stand

Stereotypes:

A "stereotype" is a generalization about a person or group of persons. We develop stereotypes when we are unable or unwilling to obtain all of the information we would need to make fair judgments about people or situations. 

In the absence of the "total picture," stereotypes in many cases allow us to "fill in the blanks." Our society often innocently creates and perpetuates stereotypes, but these stereotypes often lead to unfair discrimination and persecution when the stereotype is unfavorable.

A stereotype is a way we simplify our world. It is a short-hand way we deal with complex events. Stereotypes become dangerous when they leave us blind to individual differences.


Prejudice: 
A negative or hostile attitude toward another social group

Discrimination: 

Refers to an unfavorable action, behavior, outcome or treatment

Effects:

Less access to:
-approval and popularity
-rights and privileges (marriage, clubs, jobs)
-power, knowledge 

Exposure to social risks:

-victimization through violence (hate crimes)
-suspicion and blame for crimes (racial profiling, DWB)
-rejection, alienation and isolation, which contributes to low self esteem, self-hatred and self-destructive behavior
-economic exploitation and oppression (lower pay, less likely to be promoted, less desirable positions/jobs)

Examples in history have been:

* African-Americans being forced to ride in the back of the bus
* German Jews being required to wear a yellow "Star of David"
* minorities being referred to by pejorative slang names
* minorities being the subject of jokes which poke fun at the target's race, religion, or ethnic origin, and which rely on stereotypes
* Japanese-Americans being isolated in camps during World War II
* Native Americans having their land confiscated in violation of treaties, being the victims of government-sponsored massacres, and being placed on reservations.


Racism:
Racism of the past - overt

Racism today - subtle, hidden, difficult to combat

Examples of Modern Racism:

Cultural

-Foreigners (People of color are perceived as not being American)

-Rightness of Whiteness (renaming Native American named lakes, lands, etc.) ethnocentrism - white/western norm/standard

Individual Racism

-Denial (Brown v. Board and cases like this, solved racial problems)

-Avoidance (white flight)

-Blaming the Victim (urban poor need to "get a job")

Institutional Racism

-Employment (word of mouth, seniority system)

Discuss the "Resume Study" University of Chicago/MIT

-Housing (steering, red-lining)

-Education (few minority teachers and professors, curriculum, affirmative action)

-Politics


Hate crime

A bias motivated crime in which the offender is motivated by a characteristic of the victim as a member of some group toward which the offender feels animosity.


Why? Some perpetrators resent the growing power of a particular racial or ethnic group.


Others believe they are ridding the world of some perceived evil.


Most are spur-of-the-moment attacks often fueled by drugs/alcohol


Hate crimes send a message to all members of a perceived group. 


The key questions is motivation.


Clues:

Offensive symbols?
Offensive language?
Prior history?
Involvement with a hate group?
Victim different from other potential victims?
other motives absent?

Penalty enhancements

Teaching Tolerance Resource/Activity:

http://www.tolerance.org/activity/test-yourself-hidden-bias

CNN: Special Investigations Unit
The Display of Nooses in America

Do you think it is a symbol of hate? Why or why not? How would you respond to those who considered the hanging of a noose in a tree in front of the Jena High School a "prank." (What is a "prank"?)

January 24-28

United States History
Jim Crow: Remembering Jim Crow on Minnesota Public Radio
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2008/04/jim-crow.html


Threaded Discussion on the white board
CNN Investigative Reports: Behind the Noose
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2008/07/cnn-special-investigations-unit-display.html


Plessy v. Ferguson 1896


Notes:
Stereotypes:


A "stereotype" is a generalization about a person or group of persons. We develop stereotypes when we are unable or unwilling to obtain all of the information we would need to make fair judgments about people or situations. In the absence of the "total picture," stereotypes in many cases allow us to "fill in the blanks." Our society often innocently creates and perpetuates stereotypes, but these stereotypes often lead to unfair discrimination and persecution when the stereotype is unfavorable.


A stereotype is a way we simplify our world. It is a short-hand way we deal with complex events. Stereotypes become dangerous when they leave us blind to individual differences.


Prejudice/Discrimination:


Prejudice: A negative or hostile attitude toward another social group


Discrimination: Refers to an unfavorable action, behavior, outcome or treatment
Effects:


Less access to:


-approval and popularity


-rights and privileges


-power, knowledge and popularity




Exposure to social risks:


-victimization through violence


-suspicion and blame for crimes


-rejection, alienation and isolation, which contributes to low self esteem, self-hatred and self-destructive behavior


-economic exploitation and oppression


Examples in history have been:


* African-Americans being forced to ride in the back of the bus


* German Jews being required to wear a yellow "Star of David"


* minorities being referred to by pejorative slang names


* minorities being the subject of jokes which poke fun at the target's race, religion, or ethnic origin, and which rely on stereotypes


* Japanese-Americans being isolated in camps during World War II


* Native Americans having their land confiscated in violation of treaties, being the victims of government-sponsored massacres, and being placed on reservations.


Eyes on the Prize Notes, Worksheets, Activities:
http://www.pps.k12.or.us/depts-c/serv_learning/student_packet.pdf




English
"The Wave" Read and discuss
Continue Freedom Writers
ABC Brainstorming Activity
Moodle Activity




Personal Motto Activity:
Define "motto."


Do you have a motto? If so, what is it? What are some common themes of personal mottos?


Brainstorm ideas (from Friday)


Happiness/Joy


Kindness


Action/ Make a difference


Love


Friendship


Hope


Strength


Courage


Equality


Peace


Wisdom






Lab: Visit several quote websites. Find five quotes that appeal to you. Cut and paste them into a word document. In class on Monday, choose your favorite quote as your personal motto.


Good sites to look for quotes:


http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Main_Page




http://www.brainyquote.com/




http://www.quotegarden.com/




My favorite quotes:


Two roads diverged in a wood, and I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference. - Robert Frost
"The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy." Martin Luther King
"Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed." Martin Luther King, Jr.


Create a poster that includes your motto and pictures relating to your motto. You may include photographs, pictures from the internet, drawings, etc.




Look for pictures in the magazines on the round table. Please clean up after yourselves. Keep the classroom neat.


Type your quote. Use a large font. Print in the Library. Cut out your quote and glue it on your poster. (Take turns using the two classroom computer.)


World Studies
Continue Three Cups of Tea
ABC Brainstorming Activity
Moodle Activity





Monday, January 24, 2011

The Legacy of the Brown Decision

Segregation - our nation's caste system (keeping the races separate - denying access to African Americans)
The Brown decision would test the validity of the law - law that existed for decades (Plessy v. Ferguson, 1896)

It was essential the Supreme Court decide the case unanimously, anything less would appear weak - considering the controversial nature of the issue, unanimity was key - the Court could not give the appearance of division

The reasoning: Segregation in public education was a violation of the 14th Amendment's Equal Protection Clause

Many people viewed schools as the ticket to advancement - segregated schools would have a detrimental effect on Black children - sense of inferiority has an effect on a child's ability to learn
"... to separate them from others of similar age and qualifications because of their race generates a feeling of inferiority as to their status in the community that may affect their hearts and minds in a way very unlikely to ever be undone." From the majority, Chief Justice Earl Warren

-Controversy over footnote #11 (Clark's research)

"We conclude unanimously, that in the field of public education the doctrine of "separate but equal" has no place. Separate educational facilities are inherently unequal."

-Controversy over the language (some felt the language was weak and/or vague - for example, no specific timeline for desegregation)

Brown II: "...with all deliberate speed." Again, some felt the language too weak/vague - left open the door to Southern resistance. In fact, desegregation in much of the South moved along at a snail's pace. From the perspective of the Court, their choice in language was necessary - stronger language could have triggered greater Southern resistance.

The decision was met with harsh reaction - especially in the South (In Mississippi, there was a steady increase in violent crime against Blacks who exerted their rights following the decision.)

Violent backlash took the form of beatings, burnings, lynchings, etc.

Citizens' Council - urban, middle class hate group (goal was to make it extremely difficult for any Black to find and hold a job, get credit, vote, etc.)

Many Southern districts stalled implementation

Where desegregation occurred, what seemed to be the motivating factor(s)?

Psychology connection: What is "the psychology of inevitability"? Could that have played a role in "speeding" up the process of desegregation in some districts?

Brown was a success when all three branches of government took the decision seriously:

"The peak of the effort to desegregate the schools came in the late 1960's and early 1970s. The only period in which there was active, positive support by both the courts and the executive branch of the government was the four years following the enactment of the l964 Civil Rights Act. During this period federal education officials, the Department of Justice, and the high courts all maintained strong and reasonably consistent pressure for achieving actual desegregation. During this period desegregation policy was transformed from a very gradual anti-discrimination policy to one of rapid and full integration." http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/16_01/Seg161.shtml

1988 was the peak year for integration - steady decline ever since

Legacy of Brown:

*Offered the possibility of long-awaited change (would have consequences extending beyond public education)

*Perception the Supreme Court was an ally in the struggle for Civil Rights

*Brown shaped policy in other areas such as the criminal justice system

Additional information:

Information about the Brown decision and lesson plans/activities:

http://www.landmarkcases.org/brown/opinion1.html


Oyez Project:

http://www.oyez.org/cases/1950-1959/1952/1952_1/


Teaching Tolerance - Timeline of Integration

http://www.tolerance.org/teach/magazine/features.jsp?p=0&is=34&ar=487


Brown's Legacy

http://www.tolerance.org/teach/magazine/features.jsp?p=0&is=34&ar=485


Where are we now?

http://www.tolerance.org/teach/magazine/features.jsp?p=0&is=34&ar=489


The Strange History of School Segregation - Rethinking Schools

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/18_03/stra183.shtml


Schools More Separate - Rethinking Schools

http://www.rethinkingschools.org/archive/16_01/Seg161.shtml


"When President Kennedy asked Congress in 1964 to prohibit discrimination in all programs receiving federal aid, 98% of Southern Blacks were still in totally segregated schools."

(I'm still looking for the statistic you asked for....there is a lot of good information including the quote above from the article linked above.)

Resegregation:

The most segregated states for Black students include the leaders for the last quarter century: Illinois, Michigan, New York, and New Jersey. California, which has a small percentage of Black students, and Maryland have moved rapidly up this list. Outside the South we find the two states with the most dramatic declines in Black student contact with white students since l980: Rhode Island and Wisconsin.

Common Core Standard: R1.11-12.8
Delineate and evaluate the reasoning in seminal U.S. texts, including the application of constitutional principles and use of legal reasoning (e.g., in U.S. Supreme Court majority opinions and dissents) and the premises, purposes, and arguments in works of public advocacy (e.g., The Federalist, presidential addresses).

Friday, January 21, 2011

Letter from Birmingham Jail

"Letter from Birmingham Jail"
Answer the questions below. Comment on at least one other classmate's response to one of the questions. Your comment must shed additional insight on the question, not merely restate someone else's answer.



Questions:

Why did King write this letter?

What reasons did King give for coming to Birmingham?

Why does King use nonviolent direct-action as a means of bringing about change?

Who does King express disappointment in and why?

How does King address the timing of his actions?

How does King define "just" laws?

How does King define "unjust laws"?

Why does King believe it is a mistake for moderates to label his actions "extremist"?

Who does King believe is earning undeserved change? Why is this praise misguided?

Who is really deserving of praise? Why?

More Resources:
http://mlk-kpp01.stanford.edu/index.php/resources/article/lesson_plan_kings_letter_from_birmingham_jail/

Thursday, January 13, 2011

Marco Polo

What is discrimination?

Discrimination



When we judge people and groups based on our prejudices and stereotypes and treat them differently, we are engaging in discrimination.



Understanding the nature of prejudice, scapegoating, stereotypes, and discrimination is the first step in combating these practices. All of us have prejudices about members of groups different from ourselves. We should, however, recognize that we are not acting fairly if we treat people differently because of these stereotypes and prejudices. Each one of us deserves to be considered a unique human being.

from:
http://remember.org/guide/History.root.stereotypes.html

What is a stereotype?

Stereotypes:



A "stereotype" is a generalization about a person or group of persons. We develop stereotypes when we are unable or unwilling to obtain all of the information we would need to make fair judgments about people or situations. In the absence of the "total picture," stereotypes in many cases allow us to "fill in the blanks." Our society often innocently creates and perpetuates stereotypes, but these stereotypes often lead to unfair discrimination and persecution when the stereotype is unfavorable.


from:
http://remember.org/guide/History.root.stereotypes.html

Wednesday, January 12, 2011

Listen to the Wind Project

Listen to the Wind
http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/penguin/3_cups_of_tea_dg.pdf

Look inside the book:
http://www.amazon.com/reader/0803730586?_encoding=UTF8&page=7#reader_0803730586

Video:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/mpd/permalink/mS2VV1B9XXUA2/ref=ent_fb_link

From the Teacher Vision link above:

Listen to the Wind is illustrated in an art form called collage. Identify places on the pages where you notice elements of collage art. Using crayons, glue, and paper scraps of all types and sizes
(including newspaper, wallpaper, and regular colored paper)  create your own collage art inspired by the story and art of Listen to the Wind.

Resources:

Tissue Paper Collage Art:
http://www.ehow.com/how_6299094_make-tissue-paper-collage-art.html
Eric Carle Technique:
http://www.eric-carle.com/EricCarleCollageMakingInstructionSheet.pdf

Tuesday, January 11, 2011

The Century America's Time: Seeds of Change


Video Guide:
http://www.history.com/images/media/pdf/Century1.pdf
Study Questions
“The Century America’s Time: Seeds of Change”
1. Attitudes toward women and African Americans have changed dramatically in the twentieth century. Describe some of the changes and progress made for women and African Americans. Describe some changes that may still be necessary.

2. How have politics and technology made the twentieth century “The Killing Century”?

3. Historians of immigration use a migration theory known as push/pull. Something pushes the immigrant from his or her homeland and pulls him or her to a new homeland. Discuss some of the push/pull factors for immigrants during the waves of migration during the twentieth century.



4. Labor conditions at the beginning of the century were dangerous, dirty, and miserable. Why were conditions so bad? Why did these conditions go unchecked? Why weren’t workers able to organize and unionize for better working conditions?



5. What was Progressivism? How did the Progressive Movement shape early American ideals?



6. What were Jim Crow Laws? How did these laws conflict with American ideals?


7. Newsreels were a standard part of movie entertainment. How did these newsreels “open the world” for viewers?

Sunday, January 2, 2011

January 3-7

United States History:
Finish "Glory"
Resources:
http://www.history.com/videos/gilder-lehrman-massachussetts-54th
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/54th_Massachusetts_Volunteer_Infantry
African Americans and the Civil War:
http://www.history.com/topics/african-american-soldiers-in-the-civil-war
Read in class:
http://printables.scholastic.com/content/collateral_resources/pdf/09/TEAJAN09_004.pdf

Civil War Diorama:



How to make a battle scene diorama:
http://www.ehow.com/how_6191947_make-battle-scene-diorama.html

Wednesday-Friday:
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2011/01/immigration-late-twentieth-century.html

English:
Continue Freedom Writers Diary
Read The Terrible Things
Threaded Discussion on the white board
Choral Reading "The Terrible Things" Eve Bunting.
Threaded Discussion on the white board:
Questions: Who are "The Terrible Things"? Why didn't the forest animals resist "The Terrible Things"? In life, who are "The Terrible Things"? Why don't more people resist "The Terrible Things"?


World Studies:
Continue Three Cups of Tea
Begin Dioramas
Links (How to make a diorama):
http://www.ehow.com/how_12761_make-diorama.html
http://www.ehow.com/how_6455999_make-mountain-diorama.html

Examples: