Wednesday, December 22, 2010

Greg Mortenson on NPR

http://www.npr.org/2010/11/17/131388647/greg-mortenson-founder-of-central-asia-institute


http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=129429265


"Each time a man stands up for an ideal, or acts to improve the lot of others, or strikes out against injustice, he sends forth a tiny ripple of hope... and crossing each other from a million different centers of energy and daring those ripples build a current that can sweep down the mightiest walls of oppression and resistance." ~Robert F. Kennedy

Why we write....


“Writing is a form of therapy; sometimes I wonder how all those, who do not write, compose, or paint can manage to escape the madness, the melancholia, the panic fear, which is inherent in a human condition.”
-Graham Greene

"Writing is both mask and unveiling." ~E.B. White
"It's not plagiarism - I'm recycling words, as any good environmentally conscious writer would do." ~Uniek Swain


"You must stay drunk on writing so reality cannot
destroy you." ~Ray Bradbury

"Words - so innocent and powerless as they are, as standing in a dictionary, how potent for good and evil they become in the hands of one who knows how to combine them." ~Nathaniel Hawthorne

Friday, December 17, 2010

Standing up to Injustice and Cruelty

PBS Complete Lesson:
http://www.pbs.org/pov/film-files/pov_inheritance_lp_lesson_plan_0.pdf

Choral reading of "The Terrible Things"
Discuss (Who were the "Terrible Things"? In real life, who/what are the "Terrible Things"? Was there a moral to the story? If so, what was it?)

In class writing:
-Write about a time when they or someone else stood up for a person or persons who were being treated unjustly.
- Discuss how the choices we make when confronted with injustice and cruelty have a lasting impact on ourselves, our families and society.

Good Reads (Eve Bunting, Terrible Things)
http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/356388.Terrible_Things

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Integrity Quotes

“Integrity is doing the right thing, even if nobody is watching.”

“Integrity is not a conditional word. It doesn't blow in the wind or change with the weather. It is your inner image of yourself, and if you look in there and see a man who won't cheat, then you know he never will.”

"Character is much easier kept than recovered." ~Thomas Paine

"You do not wake up one morning a bad person. It happens by a thousand tiny surrenders of self-respect to self-interest." ~Robert Brault

"Never separate the life you live from the words you speak.” - Paul Wellstone

Freedom Writers-Reflection















Assignment #2

Select a diary entry from "Freshmen Year" pages 1-46.

Connect what you've read to an experience you have had in your own life and an experience you read about either from another book we have read in class or a book you read in another class.

Your reflection should be at least two paragraphs in length.

Extra credit opportunity:
Sketch the scene from the diary entry you selected.

Quotes about character

“Watch your thoughts, for they become words. Watch your words, for they become actions. Watch your actions, for they become habits. Watch your habits, for they become character. Watch your character, for it becomes your destiny. ” -Unknown

"A pure hand needs no glove to cover it." ~Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Scarlet Letter

"When you stretch the truth, watch out for the snapback." ~Bill Copeland

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Hadley


Quote Art!



































































The People Speak- on CBS

Lewis and Clark Activity (PBS)

Visit the link below:
http://www.pbs.org/lewisandclark/
Click on "Inside the Corps" to find the answers to 1-6:
1. How much money was appropriated to fund the expedition?
2. How many people made up the "Corps"?
3. Who were the Captains?
4. Name two mathematical instruments brought on the trip.
5. Name three examples of presents for Native Americans that was brought along on the trip.
6. What camp supplies were brought? (List four)
Click on "Native Americans" to find the answers to 7 and 8.
7. How many Native American tribes would the Corps of Discovery encounter?
8. Briefly describe the ritual performed by the Corps each time they encountered a new tribe.
Listen to the experts (Living History):
9.Who was Sacagawea, and how did she aid the expedition?
10. What kinds of animals did Lewis and Clark discover?
11.What is the larger historical significance of the expedition?

Friday, December 10, 2010

December 13-17



















United States History:
Lewis and Clark online activity:
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2010/12/lewis-and-clark-expedition-online.html
Lewis and Clark Online Activity (Do together as a class on the smartboard)
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2010/12/lewis-and-clark-activity-pbs.html


Quotes about Making a Difference

Nobody can do everything, but everyone can do something. ~Author Unknown


You must be the change you wish to see in the world. ~Mahatma Ghandi


Freedom is never voluntarily given by the oppressor; it must be demanded by the oppressed. -Martin Luther King, Jr.

"Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented."- Elie Wiesel


“The ultimate measure of a man is not where he stands in moments of comfort and convenience, but where he stands at times of challenge and controversy.” - Martin Luther King Jr.

The best way to cheer yourself is to try to cheer someone else up.
-Mark Twain

"Human progress is neither automatic nor inevitable... Every step toward the goal of justice requires sacrifice, suffering, and struggle; the tireless exertions and passionate concern of dedicated individuals." -Martin Luther King, Jr.

'Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever does.' -Margaret Mead

Lewis and Clark Expedition (online activity)

Visit the site below. Answer the questions.
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/west/index.html


1. What year did Thomas Jefferson ask Lewis to undertake this expedition?

2. What were the goals of the expedition?

3. What will you take with you on your voyage? (enough food for the two year trip or plenty of paper?)

4. As you travel, you encounter many Native Americans. Name one tribe you encounter along the way.

5. Who was Charbonneau's teenage bride who undertook most of the voyage with you?

6. She is Shoshone, true or false?

7. Along the way, you must pass through which mountains?

8. You also must cross a number of rivers. Name one.

9. How do various Native American tribes help you along the way?

Tuesday, December 7, 2010

Three Cups of Tea- Timeline Project

Illustrated Timeline
Using your storyboards as a guide, create a chronological timeline illustrating the events occurring in Three Cups of Tea. Use illustrations, clip art, and pictures taken from magazines to decorate your timeline. You may use graph paper or construction paper for your timeline.

You must include a minimum of twenty events and ten illustrations/clip art/pictures on your timeline.

Timelines must be neat and easy to read. I recommend typing your information on the computer, printing it out and gluing it on your graph paper or construction paper.


Your timelines will look like "road maps" in the shape of mountains (symbolic of both Greg's up and down struggles to accomplish his goals in Pakistan and Afghanistan and the mountainous countryside of the region.

Marbury v. Madison

Marbury v. Madison Jeopardy

People
*(100)President who attempted to preserve his philosophical legacy through a number of political appointments.
*(200)President John Adams' Secretary of State
*(300)Thomas Jefferson's Secretary of State
*(400)The Chief Justice of the Supreme Court who wrote the decision in Marbury v. Madison
*(500)The presidential election of 1800 was between ________ and ________.

Terms, etc.
*(100)The year Marbury v. Madison was decided
*(200)To strike down an act of Congress
*(300)The Supreme Law of the Land
*(400)A court order compelling a public official to take action or prohibiting a public official from taking an action
*(500)These officials tend to have less political power, as other elected officials are less inclined to cooperate with them


Law
*(100)The power to review laws and determine their Constitutionality
*(200)Article of the Constitution which describes and defines the role and responsibilities of the Judicial Branch
*(300)What did William Marbury want the Supreme Court to do?
*(400)Did the Supreme Court issue the ruling Marbury had hope for? Explain.
*(500)What three questions did the Court ask itself when deciding how to proceed in this case?

Monday, December 6, 2010

Inspirational Quotes (Speak up/Stand up)









Don't think you're on the right road just because it’s a well-beaten path. ~Author Unknown
"Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented."- Elie Wiesel

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

We must become the change we want to see in the world.
Mohandas Gandhi

'Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, committed citizens can change the world; indeed, it's the only thing that ever does.' -Margaret Mead


Sunday, December 5, 2010

Quotes about speaking up....

"Stand before the people you fear and speak your mind -- even if your voice shakes." Maggie Kuhn

"First they came for the communists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a communist;
Then they came for the socialists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a socialist;
Then they came for the trade unionists, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a trade unionist;
Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out—
because I was not a Jew;
Then they came for me—
and there was no one left to speak out for me."
— Martin Niemöller

Don't try to figure out what other people want to hear from you; figure out what you have to say. It's the one and only thing you have to offer."
~Barbara Kingsolver

A man who stands for nothing will fall for anything.
-Malcolm X

He who passively accepts evil is as much involved in it as he who helps to perpetrate it. He who accepts evil without protesting against it is really cooperating with it.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

History will have to record that the greatest tragedy of this period of social transition was not the strident clamor of the bad people, but the appalling silence of the good people.
Martin Luther King, Jr.

"We may have found a cure for most evils; but it has found no remedy for the worst of them all—the apathy of human beings." -Hellen Keller

Freedom Writers Diary

First assignment:
Find a quote about "finding your voice" or "speaking out." Create a poster including the quote and images that support the meaning of your quote.

Vocabulary Exercises: word search and crossword puzzle worksheets

Daily Journal Writing/Writing Prompts:
http://www.freedomwritersfoundation.org/site/c.kqIXL2PFJtH/b.2260037/k.93F0/Teacher_Tips.htm#prompts
Concept Map: setting, themes, characters of the book


Resources:

Freedom Writers Foundation:


Official Movie Site:




Friday, December 3, 2010

Monday, November 29, 2010

November 29-December 3

United States History:


Finish "All the President's Men"
Discuss questions 1 & 2 in class- Monday
Tuesday discuss questions 4-6
Wednesday: Threaded Discussion on the whiteboard (questions on the back of the worksheet)
Washington Post Coverage:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/politics/special/watergate/
Scholastic Magazine Article:
http://www2.scholastic.com/browse/article.jsp?id=11259

English:


Continue "Dead Poets Society"
Viewers Guide
Review: Themes of the story
Journal: Discuss the similarities and differences between the book and the movie.
A-Z Brainstorming Activity
Lab Day Thursday: Create a Wordle Word Cloud using the words from your A-Z Brainstorming worksheet


World Studies:
Read chapters 1-5 Three Cups of Tea
Discussion Questions:


How do people really make a difference?
What is their approach? Their vision?
What are the steps or process to making a difference?
What kinds of people are good at this? Are there common characteristics and/or personal attributes that visionary problem-solvers have?
What do you care about?


Beyond the Fire Activity:
http://archive.itvs.org/beyondthefire/master.html
Watch:
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4697470n&tag=mncol;lst;4
Visit CNN Heroes:
http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cnn.heroes/index.html
Suggested Grades: 7-12, College


General Discussion Questions

1. How would you define the word "hero"?


2. What are some common attributes among people we classify as heroes?


3. Name some individuals you would classify as heroes, and explain why you believe each one is a hero.


4. Do you think heroes are "born" or "made"? Explain.


5. Visit the CNN Heroes website http://www.cnn.com/SPECIALS/cnn.heroes/ and read some of the heroes' profiles. Are there any stories that are especially inspiring to you? If so, talk about the contributions that these individuals are making to improve the lives of others and why they are inspirational.

Monday, November 22, 2010

"You Be the Judge" Game

http://www.icivics.org/web-quests/you-be-judge

Fourth Amendment Interactive Games

New Jersey v. TLO:
http://www.icivics.org/games/argument-wars
"Do I Have a Right?"
http://www.icivics.org/games/do-i-have-right

World Studies: Historic Destinations Activity

Visit the following link to find the answers to the questions below. You will take a journey through the United States visiting 10 historic destinations.
http://www.history.com/interactives/historic-destinations

1. Where is Yosemite National Park?

2. How many people visit Yosemite National Park each year?

3. What is the name of Yosemite’s most recognizable rock formation?

4. The oldest institute of higher learning is near what city?

5. What is “The Big Dig”?

6. Where was the first major battle of the American Revolution fought? When was it fought?

7. The Battle of Little Big Horn is also popularly known as:

8. The battle was fought over the issue of:

9. What can be found on Last Stand Hill?

10. Where is the Alamo?

11. The Alamo serves many different purposes during its three century existence. List three.

12. Why was the Alamo attacked?

13. True or False, the battle left only two living defenders?

14. Where was Martin Luther King assassinated?

15. What is Sun Studio?

16. Explain the reason behind a plan for the Soldiers National Cemetery.

17. Who oversaw the construction of the cemetery and the dedication ceremony?

18. Lincoln’s words spoken at the dedication ceremony became knows as:

19. Philadelphia is a city of many “firsts.” List four.

20. List four museums and or monuments to visit in Washington D.C.

21. What do you need to do if you want a guided tour of the White House?

22. What are three different nicknames for New York City?

23. List five places you might visit in New York City.

24. Where is the “Space Coast”?

25. Why is it called the “Space Coast”?

If you have time:

Place the State Game:
http://www.history.com/interactives/place-the-state-game
Timed State Capital Game:
http://www.travelpod.com/traveler-iq/usa
GeoSpy Game:
http://kids.nationalgeographic.com/kids/games/geographygames/geospy/

The power of Words...to harm

Opinion piece from the NYT:
http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/11/07/speech-and-harm/
Discussion Questions:
•What gives slurs power?
•Why are slurs so offensive?
•Why do some slurs have more power than others? How do you explain why different people respond to the same slur differently?

Lewis and Clark Expedition

Library of Congress Interactive:
http://www.loc.gov/teachers/classroommaterials/presentationsandactivities/presentations/lewisandclark/
National Geographic Interactive:
http://www.nationalgeographic.com/west/

Super Cool Interactive Art Games and Activities!

Meet Me at Midnight:

Digging for Answers:
Art History Matching Game:
Salvador Dali Elimination Game:

Friday, November 19, 2010

November 22-24

United States History
U.S. v. Nixon Lecture
Background on Watergate
"All the President's Men"
Watergate
Lecture
"All the President's Men"
Watch "All the President's Men" and answer the following questions in class:

1. Who were the Washington Post reporters portrayed in the movie?

2. What techniques were used by investigative reporters in an effort to get information from their sources?

3. What ethical standards did journalists follow? Ethical standards for editors?

4. What risks are involved in running a controversial story such as the Watergate scandal? (include a brief discussion of the use of anonymous sources, challenging government leaders - even alleging criminal activity)

5. Discuss the competing interests in U.S. v. Nixon.

6. Briefly discuss the legacy of both the case and the scandal as a whole.
Discuss these questions as well:

Watergate
The following questions appear onscreen in the video. Feel free to integrate them into your lesson plan as needed.
Part I
Questions to consider before watching the video:
• As you watch the program, think about why the Watergate scandal took place. How does it compare to other scandals in recent history?
• What attitudes and beliefs of the president and his staff led to the Watergate break-in and subsequent cover-up?
• What revelations led to President Nixon's resignation?
Questions to consider after watching the video:
• Analyze the role of the press during political scandals such as Watergate.
• How did Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein uncover the Watergate story and keep it alive?
• Debate how reporters should balance respect for the role of the government with the public's right to know.
Suggested activity
• Research President Nixon's foreign policies with China and the Soviet Union.
• Compare Nixon's accomplishments with his failures and debate his overall success as president.

Part II
Questions to consider before watching the video:
• What do you know about the effects and consequences of Watergate?
• How did it affect President Nixon's place in history?
• How did it change the way Americans feel about their government?
• Think about why Watergate is still important to Americans.
Questions to consider after watching the video:
• The identity of "Deep Throat" remains a big mystery. Discuss the responsibility of journalists to protect their sources.


English
Read in class
Continue watching "Dead Poet's Society"
Viewers Guide
Quiz

World Studies
Begin Three Cups of Tea
Cause and Effect Chart
http://www.cbsnews.com/video/watch/?id=4697470n&tag=mncol;lst;4697470n&tag=mncol;lst;4

Sunday, November 14, 2010

Karma




November 15-19

United States History
The Bill of Rights

Monday: First Amendment: Rights contained in the First Amendment
Values served by protecting the First Amendment
Absolutist, Balancing and Categorical Approaches to protecting the First Amendment
Speech: What is it? Pure, Speech Plus and Symbolic
In notes, draw a continuum and label least to most protected speech.
What is protected and what isn't protected? Brainstorm.
Monday and Tuesday discuss "Time, Place, Manner" restrictions, libel and slander, "fighting words", "clear and present danger", obscenity and threats to security.
Tuesday -Thursday
Landmark Cases
Schenck v. United States
In notebooks: Draw a big question mark. Divide into six parts. Label each: Who? What? When? Why? Where? How? As I lecture, complete the question mark.
Tinker v. Des Moines
Activity: Classifying Arguments
http://www.landmarkcases.org/tinker/arguments.html
Past blog post on First Amendment:
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2008/04/intro-to-freedom-of-speech.html
Worksheet (Complete in class)
http://www.timeforkids.com/TFK/media/teachers/pdfs/2003S/030314WR1.pdf



Five Freedoms:
The 5 First Amendment Freedoms
Speech
The First Amendment says that people have the right to speak freely without government interference.

Press
The First Amendment gives the press the right to publish news, information and opinions without government interference. This also means people have the right to publish their own newspapers, newsletters, magazines, etc.

Religion
The First Amendment prohibits government from establishing a religion and protects each person's right to practice (or not practice) any faith without government interference.

Petition
The First Amendment says that people have the right to appeal to government in favor of or against policies that affect them or that they feel strongly about. This freedom includes the right to gather signatures in support of a cause and to lobby legislative bodies for or against legislation.
Assembly
The First Amendment says that people have the right to gather in public to march, protest, demonstrate, carry signs and otherwise express their views in a nonviolent way. It also means people can join and associate with groups and organizations without interference.

English
Continue reading from Dead Poets Society
Carpe Diem Posters
Present Posters on Thursday
Quiz on the book on Friday
(Setting, Plot, Theme, Characters)

World Studies
Blood Diamond Poster Project
(Create an Ad-Buster style poster illustrating the illegal diamond trade and its effects on the people involved)
Posters are due on Friday.
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2007/10/adbusting.html

Thursday, October 21, 2010

Constitution (Interactive Games, Activities)

Supreme Court Landmark Cases Interactive Game:
http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/817/preview/
U.S. Citizenship Quiz (History, Civics):
http://www.history.com/shows/classroom/interactives/citizenship-quiz
Scholastic Constitution Game:
http://teacher.scholastic.com/scholasticnews/indepth/constitution_day/constitution.asp
U.S. History
Framework of the Constitution Activity:
Preamble, Articles 1-7, Article I, Article II, Article III, Bill of Rights, Amendments 1-27, Civil War Amendments, Voting Rights Amendments
1. Cut handout into strips
2. Fill in the blanks
3. Place the strips in the proper order
Lecture: Principles of the Constitution
Popular Sovereignty
Federalism
Separation of Powers
Checks and Balances
Federalism
Judicial Review
Study Guide:
http://hansengeorge.blogspot.com/2008/01/civics-study-guide.html
What is your Constitution I.Q.? (Handout)
http://teacher.scholastic.com/scholasticnews/indepth/constitution_day/printables/ConstitutionIQ.pdf

Monday, October 11, 2010

October 11-15

United States History
The Boston Tea Party:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GJ-FWHN3ljI
Reading Materials and Discussion Questions:
http://www.libertyskids.com/pt_tips_adults.html
Highlight or underline the following terms: Tories, Patriots
Find the answer to the following question: How did Native Americans and slaves determine "sides" before and during the Revolution?
Discuss the answers in class.
Read in class:
http://www.bostonteapartyship.com/Tea%20Gazette.pdf
Writing Assignment: Look up the word "revolution" Write down the definition. Based on what you've learned so far from lecture and reading, do you believe the American Revolution was a "revolution"?

Class discussion: Compare and contrast the goals of national leaders, loyalists, women, traders and slaves in the American Revolution. Complete a graphic organizer on the white board. Draw a web on the board. In the center, write Revolution. Branching out draw two circles. In one, write yes and in the other, write no. Branching out from these circles, list which groups were likely to support or not support independence. Branching from each of these groups, list reasons why or why not.

Cause and Effect Sequencing of Events worksheet (to be worked on throughout the week)


Declaration of Independence Treasure Hunt:
http://www.constitutionfacts.com/content/funZone/files/TreasureHunt5.pdf
Sign the Declaration:
http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration_sign.html
Brainstorming/Lecture (Pros and Cons of Independence):
Advantages Disadvantages

Possibility of foreign aid from France

Legitimacy in the world community

Captured soldiers treated as POWs not spies or rebels

Independence might unite different areas of the colonies

Stating for the world the ideological basis of this new country

Freedom from subservience to the King

Might lose friends in England who supported cause of colonists in regard to representation in Parliament but not independence

Might cause division within the colonies

If Revolution failed, the and leaders might be tried and executed as traitors.

Colonies were poorly
prepared for war
Fighting the largest military
power in the world
No weapons nor
manufacturing to make them

Dependent on England for
elements needed to fight a
war.
Chances of winning the war
were slim.
Colonists would be cutting
themselves off from the
biggest, freest empire in the
world.
Sentimental attachment to
homeland.


Games:
Which Founding Father are You?
http://www.constitutionfacts.com/?page=foundingFatherShort.cfm
English
Continue Marley: A Dog Like No Other
Text to Text writing assignment. Write one complete paragraph comparing Marley to another book you have read.
Text to Life writing assignment. Write on paragraph comparing Marley to an experience in your own life.

http://www.sheppardsoftware.com/grammar/adjectives.htm

World Studies
Scholastic Magazine (Read and Activities)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ozsOLdgp_y0
Smart Board Geography:
http://www.primarygames.com/socstudies/whereonearth/index.htm

Reading (in class):
http://www.alongwaygone.com/media/ALongWayGone_Excerpt.pdf
http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/wed-february-14-2007/ishmael-beah

Child Soldier Facts:

Child Soldiers are being used in over 36 countries worldwide.

Today, there are approximately 300,000 child soldiers fighting in armed conflict.

Child soldiers are under the age of 18.

Children are used as soldiers because they are easily manipulated and are too young to understand their actions.

Child soldiers use AK-47s, M-16s and grenades because they are easy to use.
Orphans and refugees sometimes see their only hope for survival is by joining a militia.

Child soldiers are used to clear landmines and as human shields.
Child soldiers are often given drugs to help them cope with their emotions making it easier for them to kill.

Girl soldiers are often used as domestic sex slaves.

Child soldiers carry supplies and act as messengers, cooks and lookouts.

Child soldiers are sometimes forced to commit atrocities against their own families and villages.

Many child soldiers are not welcome back home after a conflict ends because of cultural superstition.

Children are the victims of conflict after witnessing or participating in murder and rape, becoming disabled, homeless or psychologically traumatized.

October 11 is National Coming Out Day

Friday, October 1, 2010

Halloween

History Channel Video:
http://www.history.com/videos/halloweens-origins#halloweens-origins

Sept. 27-Oct.8

United States History:
View the History Channel "History of Thanksgiving" video
The First Thanksgiving Scavenger Hunt Worksheet (Use National Geographic Website and History Channel Website as resources)
Complete National Geographic Online Thanksgiving Quiz
The Salem Witch Trials:
National Geographic (Salem Witch Interactive)
Discovery Education Video
PBS Videos
Online Game: "You're Accused!"
Salem Witch Trials:
Events leading to the Revolution:

English:
Continue reading Marley: A Dog Like No Other
Continue Story Board Activity
Continue Vocabulary

World Studies:
Complete United States Maps
Daily Review on the Smart Board: States and Capitals
Timed State Capital Game:
How to Read a Map- Game:

Thursday, September 16, 2010

World Studies: Movement

THEME 4: MOVEMENT
People interact with other people, places, and things almost every day of their lives. They travel from one place to another; they communicate with each other; and they rely upon products, information, and ideas that come from beyond their immediate environment.

Students should be able to recognize where resources are located, who needs them, and how they are transported over the earth’s surface. The theme of movement helps students understand how they themselves are connected with, and dependent upon, other regions, cultures, and people in the world.


What is GLOBALIZATION?
http://www.globalization101.org/What_is_Globalization.html

Different Perspectives:




http://www.nationalgeographic.com/xpeditions/lessons/15/g68/contributions.html

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

Sept 13-17

Smart Board Activities:


Interactive United States Map
http://www.pbs.org/teachers/connect/resources/5683/preview/
Landmark Supreme Court Case Interactive Game:
Constitution Interactive Quiz:
Notable Supreme Court Decisions:
Global Connections:
World Quality of Life Index:
Interactive Map: Human/Environment Interaction:
United States History:
Columbus Diary: Read and discuss in class
Prepare for mock trial (index cards)
English:
Read Preface-chapter 10 in Marley: A Dog Like No Other
Concept Maps
World Studies:
Finish worksheets assigned last week
Packet (California, Washington, Oregon, Alaska)
Begin United States Map: Draw all fifty states, name each capital, draw in major rivers (listed on the white board)
Friday: States/Capitals Bingo
Smart Board Review Game:

Tuesday, August 31, 2010

First Week of School!





Classroom Expectations:
Classroom Climate:
RESPECT
is key. What does that mean? Respect the ideas and work of your classmates. (No "put-downs," name-calling or other rude behavior will be tolerated.) NO PROFANITY.

Listen quietly while I'm giving instructions, lecturing, etc. (If this becomes an issue, I will assign seats and groups. Listen quietly while your classmates are speaking.)

NO TEXTING OR LISTENING TO IPODS DURING CLASS. I will not start class until all phones and Ipods are sitting on your desk so I can see them.

Participation:
It is important that you come to class prepared everyday. That includes coming to class with a notebook, planner, pen and highlighter.

It is also important for each person to participate in individual, small and large group activities to the best of your abilities.

General Expectations:
Please be on time. I will take attendance right after the bell rings. If you arrive late, you will be marked tardy. Three tardies will result in a referral.

Please do not abuse the pass privilege. If excessive use of passes becomes an issue, I will no longer grant bathroom, locker, etc. passes. All students coming from room 22 (my classroom) must use the bathrooms by the Little Theater. You will be given 5-7 minutes for a bathroom pass and 1-2 minutes for a drink/locker pass.


Please leave the room looking neat. Do not leave garbage on the floor or on or under your desk. Please do not write on your desks. Do not write on the white board. Please do not move desks unless I tell you to do so. Do not leave personal items in the classroom unless you have been given permission by me.

Grading Scale for all classes:
A: 100-90
B: 89-80
C: 79-70
D: 69-60
Below 60: F

Thursday-Wednesday:
United States History:
Read "The First Few Days: The Journal of Christopher Columbus"
Highlight and discuss each paragraph
Reading Deeply Questions
Venn Diagram Worksheet
Activity: The Trial "The People vs. Columbus"

Watch clips from the Biography Channel:

http://www.biography.com/video.do?name=historicalfigures&bcpid=1740037434&bclid=1184769682&bctid=1184676969

History Channel: "Columbus Man and Myth"

English (Thursday-Wednesday):
Personal Timeline Projects
Worksheet- complete before begining timelines
Tuesday and Wednesday- Hand out rubrics, create timelines
Locate images to include on timelines

World Studies (Days 1-3):
http://www.history.com/interactives/historic-destinations

Visit the following link to find the answers to the questions below. You will take a journey through the United States visiting 10 historic destinations. You will need to visit all ten destinations to find the answers to all the questions on the final.

http://www.history.com/interactives/historic-destinations

1. Where is Yosemite National Park?

2. How many people visit Yosemite National Park each year?

3. What is the name of Yosemite’s most recognizable rock formation?

4. The oldest institute of higher learning is near what city?

5. What is “The Big Dig”?

6. Where was the first major battle of the American Revolution fought? When was it fought?

7. The Battle of Little Big Horn is also popularly known as:

8. The battle was fought over the issue of:

9. What can be found on Last Stand Hill?

10. Where is the Alamo?

11. The Alamo serves many different purposes during its three century existence. List three.

12. Why was the Alamo attacked?

13. True or False, the battle left only two living defenders?

14. Where was Martin Luther King assassinated?

15. What is Sun Studio?

16. Explain the reason behind a plan for the Soldiers National Cemetery.

17. Who oversaw the construction of the cemetery and the dedication ceremony?

18. Lincoln’s words spoken at the dedication ceremony became knows as:

19. Philadelphia is a city of many “firsts.” List four.

20. List four museums and or monuments to visit in Washington D.C.

21. What do you need to do if you want a guided tour of the White House?

22. What are three different nicknames for New York City?

23. List five places you might visit in New York City.

24. Where is the “Space Coast”?

25. Why is it called the “Space Coast”?

Monday, June 7, 2010

History Recovery- Project Suggestions









History Collage:
Choose a movie from the list of U.S. History movie suggestions on the blog. Using pictures from magazines, newspapers or images found online, create a collage demonstrating the main ideas of the film. Present the collage to your teacher explaining the symbolism of the images you selected. Don't forget to include in your collage the "Five W's and an H" (who, what, when, why, where, how).

Thursday, June 3, 2010

U.S. History Project Suggestions- Creating Word Clouds

Watch a movie from the list of suggested history movies on the blog. Brainstorm a list of 26 words that best describe the movie (one for each letter of the alphabet). If you can't think of a word for the letter "X," don't worry about it.

Type your words into a microsoft word document. Do a spell check. Copy and past your list into wordle.


Go to "Create." Paste your list of words into the box. Design your word cloud. You can change the colors, fonts and layout of your cloud.

Print your word cloud and hand it in to your teacher.